Ten Benefits of One on One Meetings

Meetings make up a large proportion of our working day.  Hardly a day goes by without several – in fact, back to backs are probably more commonplace!

One on one meetings - The Leader's Digest by Suzi McAlpine

But of all the meetings that we attend as leaders, those monthly or fortnightly one-on-ones with our direct reports are one of the most significant and impactful in terms of our effectiveness as leaders.

However, there has been the odd occasion where I have postponed or even cancelled a one on one, neglecting to give it the preparation and thought it deserves.  

One on ones are often overridden by what seem to be more urgent or important matters.

I am sure you are aware of the benefits of one on ones, so as a ‘refresher’, here are my top ten reasons why they are so important.

One on ones enable us to:

1. Ascertain levels of motivation in each of your team members.  Motivation is the key to performance. How motivated are they right now? Is there anything that is going on in their private life which is having an impact on their work?  What is currently driving them to perform at their best (or getting in the way of that happening)?

2. Address any performance issues before they become serious.  Often, when we first notice an area for improvement in one of our staff, it may be minor. This is the time to talk about it, before it becomes a big issue for them and for you.  One on ones are a great mechanism for feedback.

3. Highlight good performance you have noticed. The best positive feedback is timely and one on ones aid us to do this.

4. Ensure their Performance Development Plan is a LIVE document (instead of being shoved in the draw and brought out once or twice a year). Talking about ‘PDP’s’ in one on ones means there are no surprises when you have the annual or six monthly performance appraisals.

5. Receive feedback from them.  What are you doing that is supporting or hindering their progress? The key is to enable the flow of communication to go both ways within an organisation, so their feedback is a vital part of making this happen.

Teamwork - a reciprocal flow of information, The Leader's Digest

6. Reinforce important messages about change or company direction.  This is also an opportunity to garner feedback from them about various initiatives i.e. do they support the change or not? How are they being affected by the change?

7. Brainstorm ideas and solutions for team problems or challenges.  Remember, you do not have all the answers. A problem affecting the team could be solved by discussing their perspective in your one on one.  This can be particularly effective if a team member is shy and therefore less likely to pipe up in a group situation.

8. To facilitate exploration of areas in their job they are struggling with.  This is where you as a leader can coach them.

9. To strengthen the rapport and connection between you both. One on ones are a great way to ‘put money in the bank’ for this vital working relationship.

10. To act as a litmus test for the mood of the team as a whole.  Meeting with every team member individually within a month will give you a better gauge of how the team is performing overall.

– Suzi

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About The Leader's Digest

I'm a leadership coach with over 15 years of experience in working alongside CEOs and senior leaders to harness their full potential - and achieve maximum results. The Leader's Digest is a pocket compendium, providing free leadership tips, insights and inspiration for busy executives, supporting the journey to great leadership.
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One Response to Ten Benefits of One on One Meetings

  1. Pingback: 6 Simple Ways to Run Successful Meetings | The Leader's Digest – by Suzi McAlpine, Executive Coach

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